Voice Input and Translation Work (#Android, #Swype, #AIORemote), Take 2

In this article I’ll talk about using your Android device as a dictate box for your CAT tool or any other program where you need to type on your computer. Before going into specifics of this little recipe, let us overview the components in general. You’ll need these ingredients:

  1. Android keyboard that has a voice recognition option.
  2. Android application that works as a remote keyboard for your computer.
  3. Desktop application that receives input from the Android remote app.

There are quite a few nice Android keyboards and Android remote controls out there that would allow you to brew a similar goody, but I’ll describe what I believe is the most efficient mix. Continue reading

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Voice Input in Translation Work (#Linux + Chrome + #OmegaT), Take 1

I always was rather skeptical about using dictate software in my translation work. But recently I read a success story where a person started to use Dragon Naturally Speaking, and it boosted his productivity by ungodly high percentage. Though it didn’t shake the deep skepticism of a die-hard Linux fanatic whose main target language isn’t supported by the major dictate software vendors, it doesn’t hurt to fool around and try a few things, does it?

As it turns out, one can save quite a few keystrokes by speaking into the cloud, and it can even be used on Linux in OmegaT. Google’s speech recognition supports my target language, several Chromium/Chrome browser’s apps and extensions kindly try to make written words out of my utterances, and then it’s up to me how I put it all together to be able to dictate instead of typing.

My working recipe is based on using SpeechPad – new voice notebook for voice input. This little thing can be installed as a Chrome app and can work in background, putting the recognized pieces into the clipboard. To enable that, one needs to put ticks in ” Restart on errors” and ” Transfer to clipboard”. It’s best to register with this application to be able to add new languages not listed by default (limited to what Google supports), add terms to the custom replacement list (to enable punctuation by voice for some languages, for instance), and do other things. It’s all done in the user’s profile (called “User data” on the main page). When the SpeechPad is fired up and listening in the background, you can switch to the app where you need to type (OmegaT in my case), dictate a logical chunk and press Ctrl+V. Some of the repeated mistakes in the text can be fixed with replace_with_template.groovy (see here for details on how to use the script). Or pasting and fixing can be done with one OmegaT script insert_modify_clipboard.groovy (the above link with details still applies, but substitution template should be named .ini/clipboard_substitution.ini).

I’ve noticed that in Ukrainian the speech gets recognized much better when I chant it (and that’s where my passion for the byzantine rite liturgical chanting comes real handy, although one of my buddies said that Rammstein style singing provides similar results). With all of it I did manage to get a productivity boost (and unplanned chanting practice). I’d be happy to hear suggestions on how to improve this recipe or change the ingredients to be able to type less and produce more.


But as of now,
Good luck

Clickable links in OmegaT# notes and comments

Here’s a GitHub project for an OmegaT plugin that converts URL’s in notes and comments into clickable items that open the URL’s in the default browser. Pretty neat, especially when you’re working in a team project and need to insert references for the editor or another translator.

Clickable links example

In order to install the plugin one needs to create a folder named LinkBuilder (or whatever sounds good and preferably makes sense) inside plugins subfolder either in the OmegaT installation folder, or in OmegaT settings folder, download the latest release, and unzip it into the newly created LinkBuilder folder. The plugin will be activated upon OmegaT restart (or in a new OmegaT instance).

I don’t know who the author of the plugin is (other than his username at GitHub is hiohiohio), but kudos anyway!!!

Major update to #OmegaT QA Script

Sometime ago my monkey approach to programming led me to creating a GUI for QA rules checking script. That was fun, the result was sometimes even usable, but since I don’t really know how to program, I got stuck with developing it. Ok, a rule or two was added now and then, but that doesn’t really count. But then all of a sudden the spellcheck script in OmegaT got drastically improved, and that meant I could mimic some new ideas. That’s exactly what I did, and here’s the new “QA – Check Rules” script:

Image

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Customizing #OmegaT Kaptain Launcher (GNU/Linux)

OmegaT for GNU/Linux comes with a nifty launcher that gives you a comprehensive GUI to most of the startup parameters without needing to do anything on the command line. Along with that I’m not sure that many Linux user use this script. I think, one of the reasons for that is that the script doesn’t save your choices and you have to enter them at each run, which isn’t too bad if OmegaT was installed by the provided installation script (a rare case, as far as I can tell). And then the launcher is written in a somewhat obscure scripting language that requires some familiarization if the defaults are to be edited. In this article I’ll show which parts of the code correspond to the respective GUI elements and what can be edited to make this script customized. Continue reading

Installing and using #OmegaT scripts (Reblog/Translation)

I meant to write a short article about OmegaT script basics for a long time, but never found time to do so. This mishap got fixed without me, and out of gratitude I’m posting my translation of Gli script di OmegaT by LanguageLane. Continue reading

“Filtered” Note Export in #OmegaT

This script is variation of the one published before that exports all notes in the current project. The only difference is that this one allows you to select which notes will get exported based on the first line of the note. The resultant HTML table will consist of four columns: Source, Target, Filtered Notes (adjustable heading name), and Reply.
Say, you want to be able to export only the notes that start with <query>, as you’ve been using this word (<query>) to mark your questions to the client. In order to do so, go to line 14 and specify which mark-word was used. Note: The mark-word used to filter notes should be found in the very beginning of the very first line of the note, otherwise it’ll be ignored. In line 15 you can specify the column heading.

All project notes

All project notes

Only filtered notes

Only filtered notes

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Export #OmegaT Project Notes

Here’s a new script that lets you export OmegaT project notes to a HTML table. It may help you to discuss different translation issues with the client/editor/your spiritual guru or review your own translation if you use notes for yourself.

When the script is invoked, it will create a file named PROJECTNAME_notes.html in /script_output subfolder of the current project root (the subfolder will be created if it doesn’t exist, and PROJECTNAME is the actual name, of course).

Exported notes screenshot
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XLIFF to TMX

One of the recent scripts published here allowed OmegaT users who wanted their project to be worked on in a different CAT tool, to export the whole OmegaT project to an XLIFF file. To get the completed work back to OmegaT, one had to run Okapi Rainbow to convert XLIFF to TMX, possibly using the Rainbow settings file created by the script.

In this post I’ll share how to convert those OmegaT-created XLIFF files finished (or partly finished) in Trados/MemoQ/Deja Vu/WhatNotCAT back to TMX that can be used in OmegaT (all tags preserved, of course, that was the whole point), right from within OmegaT, without running Rainbow manually. Continue reading